Roasted Butternut Squash Bisque

Prep time: 30-120 minutes
Servings: 24

Ingredients

  • 2 3/4 cups AP Flour
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 cup butter, softened
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 3-4 tbs buttermilk
64.4444

Directions

Preheat your oven to 375F.

Using your stand mixer, cream the butter and sugar together. Add the egg, then the vanilla.

In a separate bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda and baking powder.

Slowly add the dry to the wet. Add just enough of the buttermilk to make the dough to hold together, but not too wet and sticky.

For turning into cookies, you can:

  • Drop them using a scoop like you would the classic chocolate chip cookies.
  • Roll them into balls, then press down on the top.
  • Roll them into a log, then chill and cut.
  • Roll them into a sheet, then chill and cut.
  • Or just bake them.

Bake for 8-10 minutes until golden brown. Double the time if baking as a whole sheet.

And decorate however you want -- either sugaring prior to baking or frosting afterward.

Notes

I don't keep fresh buttermilk onhand, but i do keep powdered; so I added powdered buttermilk to the dry, and used milk in the wet.

If using as cutouts, this recipe may not work very well as it does tend to flatten a bit in the pan. If doing cutouts, I would make sure they're very very cold when you put them in the oven so that the outside cooks enough, but I'm not sure that's enough. This may only really work for standard drop cookies or the sheet cookie I made.

Prep time: 30-120 minutes
Servings: 24

Ingredients

  • 2 3/4 cups AP Flour
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 cup butter, softened
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 3-4 tbs buttermilk
64.4444

Directions

Preheat your oven to 375F.

Using your stand mixer, cream the butter and sugar together. Add the egg, then the vanilla.

In a separate bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda and baking powder.

Slowly add the dry to the wet. Add just enough of the buttermilk to make the dough to hold together, but not too wet and sticky.

For turning into cookies, you can:

  • Drop them using a scoop like you would the classic chocolate chip cookies.
  • Roll them into balls, then press down on the top.
  • Roll them into a log, then chill and cut.
  • Roll them into a sheet, then chill and cut.
  • Or just bake them.

Bake for 8-10 minutes until golden brown. Double the time if baking as a whole sheet.

And decorate however you want -- either sugaring prior to baking or frosting afterward.

Notes

I don't keep fresh buttermilk onhand, but i do keep powdered; so I added powdered buttermilk to the dry, and used milk in the wet.

If using as cutouts, this recipe may not work very well as it does tend to flatten a bit in the pan. If doing cutouts, I would make sure they're very very cold when you put them in the oven so that the outside cooks enough, but I'm not sure that's enough. This may only really work for standard drop cookies or the sheet cookie I made.

Prep time: 120 minutes
Servings: 4

Ingredients

  • 2 acorn squashes
  • 1 pound italian sausage, without the cases
  • 1/2 lb crimini or button mushrooms, roughly chopped
  • 1.5 cups cooked white, black, brown or wild rice
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 large carrot, diced
  • 1 onion, diced
  • 2 tbs butter
  • generous pinch of salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup shredded parmesan cheese, plus a bit more for topping
  • 1/4 cup white wine
62.1818

Directions

Cut the acorn squash in half and scoop out the seeds and insides. Place 1/2 tbs butter inside each half and salt generously. Bake, covered with foil at 375 degrees for 35 minutes, until the flesh is tender.

Meanwhile, in a large skillet, saute the italian sausage until it is no longer pink. Remove sausage and set aside. In the same pan, saute the onion, carrot and garlic until the onion is nice and soft. Add the mushrooms and saute until they've shrunk down and become soft. Add the wine and deglaze the pan, then simmer and reduce the wine; this will take only a few moments. Then add the sausage back in, along with the cooked rice and the shredded parmesan cheese. Taste the mixture, add salt and pepper if needed (whether this is needed depends greatly on the sausage!)

Stuff the squashes, piling the mixture a bit above the rims of the cups. Place back in the oven and bake at 400 for another 10-15 minutes, until mixture is bubbly. Pull out and top with more grated cheese; return to oven and let the cheese melt and just start to brown.

Serve immediately.

Notes

You can, as I did, fake the italian sausage by mixing salt, ground fennel seed (Freshly ground!!), sage, red pepper flakes, marjoram, thyme, tarragon, smoked paprika and garlic. Mix well with the ground pork, and let sit for an hour or two (if you have it, I didn't, it worked out just fine) to let the meat soak up the flavors.

Oh yeah, the onion and carrot should've been joined by celery to be classic mirepoix but I had none on hand. Feel free to assume that it should be in there.

Also, let's be totally honest: There's a million ways you can do this to personalize it. Make the flavors in the stuffing balance in any way that fits your palette. The important part is to balance some salt, umami and rice to mix with the squash. For my, the cheese was the thing that put the mixture over the top; that deep flavor of parmesan with the mushroom and sausage was a big hit, at least with the adults. The kids ate leftover pizza instead. :)

Prep time: 90 minutes
Servings: 6-8

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds bone-in short ribs, thick cut
  • 1 small onion OR 1/2 leek OR 1 shallot, cut into chunks
  • 2 medium carrots, cut into chunks
  • 2 stalks celery, cut into chunks
  • 1 cup red wine
  • 6-8 cloves garlic
  • 2 cups beef stock
  • 3-4 stems of fresh thyme
  • 2 bay leaves
  • salt & pepper to taste
  • 3-4 tbs flour
61.76

Directions

Liberally salt and pepper the short ribs. Cut the short ribs into chunks, each with one bone. Turn your pressure cooker up to medium high heat. Sear each piece in the pressure cooker. It probably takes a couple of waves to get all of the meat seared. Remove from the pressure cooker when finished.

Deglaze the pressure cooker with the stock. Add all the vegetables at once. Stir until the stock is bubbly and the vegetables are just barely starting to soften. Add the wine, the spices and then the meat. Put the top on the pressure cooker and cook per pressure cooker instructions for one hour.

Put the cooker under the cold water tap until the pressure cooker's valve releases. Then remove the top. Pour the contents into a strainer and reserve the liquid into a bowl. Pick out the meat pieces and discard the bones, vegetables and bay leaves. Pour 1-2 cups of the liquid into a sauce pan (or back into the pressure cooker) and return to a simmer. Note: There may be more liquid than you need.

Add half a cup of water to the flour and stir until it's a consistent paste. Add the flour mixture to the liquid, and simmer until you have a nice smooth sauce.

You can serve this over rice, noodles, potatoes or polenta and nearly any veggie works as a side.

Notes

Sometimes I add a little balsamic to the mix in addition to the wine, which tends to sweeten it a little bit. The very first time I made this, I served it with white beans that had been made with mirepoix, and that was delicious too!

Prep time: 120-180 minutes
Servings: 8-12

Ingredients

  • 2 medium butternut squashes
  • 1 medium onion
  • A small piece of fresh ginger, about 1/4 tsp.
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 2 cups chicken or vegetable stock
  • 8 fresh sage leaves, finely minced.
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 1 tsp kosher salt (or to taste)
60.9677

Directions

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees.

Slice the squashes in half, lengthwise. Remove seeds and strings. Peel the onions and cut in half.

Place the onions, peel ginger, and garlic in the hollow of the squashes, and place them skin side up on a lightly oiled roasting pan, so that the onion and garlic are completely covered by the squash.

Roast for 1.5 hours. Remove from oven and allow to cool.

Scoop flesh from the rind. Put garlic, onion and squash into a blender. Grate the ginger down with a microplane grater into the blender. Puree the mixture until smooth.

Pour mixture into a pot, add stock and cream and warm to a near simmer, but do not boil. Add salt, cinnamon and nutmeg. Add pepper to taste.

Prep time: 30-45 minutes
Servings: 12

Ingredients

  • 1.5 lb ground beef or ground turkey
  • 1 lb ground pork
  • 1 onion, minced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 1 15oz can tomato sauce
  • 1 6oz can tomato paste
  • 2-3 tablespoons chili powder (or more!)
  • 1 tsp ground oregano
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika
  • 1 tsp dry mustard
  • 1 tsp hot sauce (optional)
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper (optional)
  • 2 tbs worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tbs cane vinegar (or white vinegar or rice vinegar)
  • 3 tbs brown sugar
  • 1 tbs salt (or to taste)
69.28570000000001

Directions

Over medium-high heat, saute the onion in the olive oil with a pinch of the salt until the onions are soft and starting to caramelize.

Add all the meat, the garlic and the rest of the salt. Break up the meat and cook until it's brown. If using ground beef you'll want to drain the oil off at this stage, then return it to the pan.

Add the tomato sauce, paste, chili powder, paprika, cumin, ground oregano, mustard, vinegar and worcestershire sauce. Cook on high heat and stir regularly until most of the liquid has been cooked off. The tomato will start to brown in the pan, that's when you know you're almost done. Lower the heat to medium and cook a few minutes more. You should have a nice, thick gloppy texture.

Serve on toasted rolls, with hot sauce on the top if you like.

Notes

When I researched the best way to make sloppy joes, I found that most recipes used ketchup and a quarter cup or so of brown sugar. Both of these things lead to a sweeter sloppy joe. This is all right if you like that, but I want mine to be a bit more savory. Instead, I get sweetness by caramelizing the tomato paste, which gives a natural sweetness to the mixture that isn't as cloying. Most recipes also use celery; I personally dislike it (as does the rest of my family) so I don't bother with it, but other people may find it to add a nice flavor.

The secrets of this recipe are: Finding the right balance of salt, cooking hot enough and long enough that the tomato caramelizes, and making sure to cook as much of the liquid from the tomato sauce out as possible. The other secret is the bread: you want a roll that is dense and a little bit chewy that soaks up the sauce and gives a good mouth feel. A traditional hamburger bun will work, but the texture you want is more like what you'll get from a hoagie roll (though that's way too big). Also, use a small bun! These things are filling!

Prep time: 30-45 minutes
Servings: 12

Ingredients

  • 1.5 lb ground beef or ground turkey
  • 1 lb ground pork
  • 1 onion, minced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 1 15oz can tomato sauce
  • 1 6oz can tomato paste
  • 2-3 tablespoons chili powder (or more!)
  • 1 tsp ground oregano
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika
  • 1 tsp dry mustard
  • 1 tsp hot sauce (optional)
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper (optional)
  • 2 tbs worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tbs cane vinegar (or white vinegar or rice vinegar)
  • 3 tbs brown sugar
  • 1 tbs salt (or to taste)
69.28570000000001

Directions

Over medium-high heat, saute the onion in the olive oil with a pinch of the salt until the onions are soft and starting to caramelize.

Add all the meat, the garlic and the rest of the salt. Break up the meat and cook until it's brown. If using ground beef you'll want to drain the oil off at this stage, then return it to the pan.

Add the tomato sauce, paste, chili powder, paprika, cumin, ground oregano, mustard, vinegar and worcestershire sauce. Cook on high heat and stir regularly until most of the liquid has been cooked off. The tomato will start to brown in the pan, that's when you know you're almost done. Lower the heat to medium and cook a few minutes more. You should have a nice, thick gloppy texture.

Serve on toasted rolls, with hot sauce on the top if you like.

Notes

When I researched the best way to make sloppy joes, I found that most recipes used ketchup and a quarter cup or so of brown sugar. Both of these things lead to a sweeter sloppy joe. This is all right if you like that, but I want mine to be a bit more savory. Instead, I get sweetness by caramelizing the tomato paste, which gives a natural sweetness to the mixture that isn't as cloying. Most recipes also use celery; I personally dislike it (as does the rest of my family) so I don't bother with it, but other people may find it to add a nice flavor.

The secrets of this recipe are: Finding the right balance of salt, cooking hot enough and long enough that the tomato caramelizes, and making sure to cook as much of the liquid from the tomato sauce out as possible. The other secret is the bread: you want a roll that is dense and a little bit chewy that soaks up the sauce and gives a good mouth feel. A traditional hamburger bun will work, but the texture you want is more like what you'll get from a hoagie roll (though that's way too big). Also, use a small bun! These things are filling!

Prep time: 30-45 minutes
Servings: 12

Ingredients

  • 1.5 lb ground beef or ground turkey
  • 1 lb ground pork
  • 1 onion, minced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 1 15oz can tomato sauce
  • 1 6oz can tomato paste
  • 2-3 tablespoons chili powder (or more!)
  • 1 tsp ground oregano
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika
  • 1 tsp dry mustard
  • 1 tsp hot sauce (optional)
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper (optional)
  • 2 tbs worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tbs cane vinegar (or white vinegar or rice vinegar)
  • 3 tbs brown sugar
  • 1 tbs salt (or to taste)
69.28570000000001

Directions

Over medium-high heat, saute the onion in the olive oil with a pinch of the salt until the onions are soft and starting to caramelize.

Add all the meat, the garlic and the rest of the salt. Break up the meat and cook until it's brown. If using ground beef you'll want to drain the oil off at this stage, then return it to the pan.

Add the tomato sauce, paste, chili powder, paprika, cumin, ground oregano, mustard, vinegar and worcestershire sauce. Cook on high heat and stir regularly until most of the liquid has been cooked off. The tomato will start to brown in the pan, that's when you know you're almost done. Lower the heat to medium and cook a few minutes more. You should have a nice, thick gloppy texture.

Serve on toasted rolls, with hot sauce on the top if you like.

Notes

When I researched the best way to make sloppy joes, I found that most recipes used ketchup and a quarter cup or so of brown sugar. Both of these things lead to a sweeter sloppy joe. This is all right if you like that, but I want mine to be a bit more savory. Instead, I get sweetness by caramelizing the tomato paste, which gives a natural sweetness to the mixture that isn't as cloying. Most recipes also use celery; I personally dislike it (as does the rest of my family) so I don't bother with it, but other people may find it to add a nice flavor.

The secrets of this recipe are: Finding the right balance of salt, cooking hot enough and long enough that the tomato caramelizes, and making sure to cook as much of the liquid from the tomato sauce out as possible. The other secret is the bread: you want a roll that is dense and a little bit chewy that soaks up the sauce and gives a good mouth feel. A traditional hamburger bun will work, but the texture you want is more like what you'll get from a hoagie roll (though that's way too big). Also, use a small bun! These things are filling!

Prep time: 30-45 minutes
Servings: 12

Ingredients

  • 1.5 lb ground beef or ground turkey
  • 1 lb ground pork
  • 1 onion, minced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 1 15oz can tomato sauce
  • 1 6oz can tomato paste
  • 2-3 tablespoons chili powder (or more!)
  • 1 tsp ground oregano
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika
  • 1 tsp dry mustard
  • 1 tsp hot sauce (optional)
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper (optional)
  • 2 tbs worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tbs cane vinegar (or white vinegar or rice vinegar)
  • 3 tbs brown sugar
  • 1 tbs salt (or to taste)
69.28570000000001

Directions

Over medium-high heat, saute the onion in the olive oil with a pinch of the salt until the onions are soft and starting to caramelize.

Add all the meat, the garlic and the rest of the salt. Break up the meat and cook until it's brown. If using ground beef you'll want to drain the oil off at this stage, then return it to the pan.

Add the tomato sauce, paste, chili powder, paprika, cumin, ground oregano, mustard, vinegar and worcestershire sauce. Cook on high heat and stir regularly until most of the liquid has been cooked off. The tomato will start to brown in the pan, that's when you know you're almost done. Lower the heat to medium and cook a few minutes more. You should have a nice, thick gloppy texture.

Serve on toasted rolls, with hot sauce on the top if you like.

Notes

When I researched the best way to make sloppy joes, I found that most recipes used ketchup and a quarter cup or so of brown sugar. Both of these things lead to a sweeter sloppy joe. This is all right if you like that, but I want mine to be a bit more savory. Instead, I get sweetness by caramelizing the tomato paste, which gives a natural sweetness to the mixture that isn't as cloying. Most recipes also use celery; I personally dislike it (as does the rest of my family) so I don't bother with it, but other people may find it to add a nice flavor.

The secrets of this recipe are: Finding the right balance of salt, cooking hot enough and long enough that the tomato caramelizes, and making sure to cook as much of the liquid from the tomato sauce out as possible. The other secret is the bread: you want a roll that is dense and a little bit chewy that soaks up the sauce and gives a good mouth feel. A traditional hamburger bun will work, but the texture you want is more like what you'll get from a hoagie roll (though that's way too big). Also, use a small bun! These things are filling!

Prep time: 30-45 minutes
Servings: 12

Ingredients

  • 1.5 lb ground beef or ground turkey
  • 1 lb ground pork
  • 1 onion, minced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 1 15oz can tomato sauce
  • 1 6oz can tomato paste
  • 2-3 tablespoons chili powder (or more!)
  • 1 tsp ground oregano
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika
  • 1 tsp dry mustard
  • 1 tsp hot sauce (optional)
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper (optional)
  • 2 tbs worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tbs cane vinegar (or white vinegar or rice vinegar)
  • 3 tbs brown sugar
  • 1 tbs salt (or to taste)
69.28570000000001

Directions

Over medium-high heat, saute the onion in the olive oil with a pinch of the salt until the onions are soft and starting to caramelize.

Add all the meat, the garlic and the rest of the salt. Break up the meat and cook until it's brown. If using ground beef you'll want to drain the oil off at this stage, then return it to the pan.

Add the tomato sauce, paste, chili powder, paprika, cumin, ground oregano, mustard, vinegar and worcestershire sauce. Cook on high heat and stir regularly until most of the liquid has been cooked off. The tomato will start to brown in the pan, that's when you know you're almost done. Lower the heat to medium and cook a few minutes more. You should have a nice, thick gloppy texture.

Serve on toasted rolls, with hot sauce on the top if you like.

Notes

When I researched the best way to make sloppy joes, I found that most recipes used ketchup and a quarter cup or so of brown sugar. Both of these things lead to a sweeter sloppy joe. This is all right if you like that, but I want mine to be a bit more savory. Instead, I get sweetness by caramelizing the tomato paste, which gives a natural sweetness to the mixture that isn't as cloying. Most recipes also use celery; I personally dislike it (as does the rest of my family) so I don't bother with it, but other people may find it to add a nice flavor.

The secrets of this recipe are: Finding the right balance of salt, cooking hot enough and long enough that the tomato caramelizes, and making sure to cook as much of the liquid from the tomato sauce out as possible. The other secret is the bread: you want a roll that is dense and a little bit chewy that soaks up the sauce and gives a good mouth feel. A traditional hamburger bun will work, but the texture you want is more like what you'll get from a hoagie roll (though that's way too big). Also, use a small bun! These things are filling!

Pages